In the Journals

Budesonide via pressurized metered-dose inhaler improves symptoms in pediatric asthma

Use of budesonide administered through a pressurized meter-dose inhaler considerably improved outcomes among pediatric patients with asthma, according to study results.

“Ultimately, the health care professional will select the device that best meets the individual patient’s needs and with which the patient is satisfied and comfortable,” Eli O. Meltzer, MD, of the Allergy and Asthma Medical Group and Research Center in San Diego, and colleagues wrote. “For these reasons, it is beneficial to show the efficacy and safety of asthma medications across a range of delivery devices.”

Meltzer and colleagues evaluated the use of budesonide administered through a pressurized meter-dose inhaler in 304 pediatric patients aged 6 to 12 years (mean age, 9 years).

Patients received either 80 mg budesonide two times per day or placebo after a 7- to 21-day run-in period.

Results showed patients who received budesonide demonstrated significantly improved morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) compared with those who received placebo. Mean treatment effect was 13.6 L/min (P < .0001).

The budesonide-treated patients also demonstrated significant improvements in forced expiratory volume in 1 second, evening PEF, forced expiratory flow at 25% and 75% of pulmonary volume, reliever medication use, nighttime awakenings and awakenings with reliever use.

Researchers also reported significant increases in the percentage of patients with at least 15 L/min and at least 30-L/min increases in PEF from baseline.

No serious adverse events were reported. Fewer patients in the budesonide group experienced adverse events or required treatment discontinuation. – by Jeff Craven

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Use of budesonide administered through a pressurized meter-dose inhaler considerably improved outcomes among pediatric patients with asthma, according to study results.

“Ultimately, the health care professional will select the device that best meets the individual patient’s needs and with which the patient is satisfied and comfortable,” Eli O. Meltzer, MD, of the Allergy and Asthma Medical Group and Research Center in San Diego, and colleagues wrote. “For these reasons, it is beneficial to show the efficacy and safety of asthma medications across a range of delivery devices.”

Meltzer and colleagues evaluated the use of budesonide administered through a pressurized meter-dose inhaler in 304 pediatric patients aged 6 to 12 years (mean age, 9 years).

Patients received either 80 mg budesonide two times per day or placebo after a 7- to 21-day run-in period.

Results showed patients who received budesonide demonstrated significantly improved morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) compared with those who received placebo. Mean treatment effect was 13.6 L/min (P < .0001).

The budesonide-treated patients also demonstrated significant improvements in forced expiratory volume in 1 second, evening PEF, forced expiratory flow at 25% and 75% of pulmonary volume, reliever medication use, nighttime awakenings and awakenings with reliever use.

Researchers also reported significant increases in the percentage of patients with at least 15 L/min and at least 30-L/min increases in PEF from baseline.

No serious adverse events were reported. Fewer patients in the budesonide group experienced adverse events or required treatment discontinuation. – by Jeff Craven

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.