In the Journals

Novel costal cartilage technique may be faster, safer for reconstructing nasal framework

A novel costal cartilage technique for reconstructing the nasal framework shows early signs of being both safer and less complicated than other techniques.

The researchers wrote that techniques have evolved to reduce expected morbidity associated with harvesting and using rib grafts in this procedure. The current technique mitigates a number of risks and complications, including pleural tear, donor-site pain and the attendant respiratory splinting and pneumonia. It also entails a long-acting local anesthetic for reducing pain after the procedure.

Medial and lateral incisions are made into the donor rib at two-thirds depth, according to the researchers. A connecting transverse incision through the cartilage is then made at the same depth. The researchers wrote that this connects the medial and lateral cuts and leaves a posterior intact bridge of cartilage along the wall of the chest.

Use of a bent blade for this procedure is essential to making the necessary small incisions, according to the findings. – by Rob Volansky

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

A novel costal cartilage technique for reconstructing the nasal framework shows early signs of being both safer and less complicated than other techniques.

The researchers wrote that techniques have evolved to reduce expected morbidity associated with harvesting and using rib grafts in this procedure. The current technique mitigates a number of risks and complications, including pleural tear, donor-site pain and the attendant respiratory splinting and pneumonia. It also entails a long-acting local anesthetic for reducing pain after the procedure.

Medial and lateral incisions are made into the donor rib at two-thirds depth, according to the researchers. A connecting transverse incision through the cartilage is then made at the same depth. The researchers wrote that this connects the medial and lateral cuts and leaves a posterior intact bridge of cartilage along the wall of the chest.

Use of a bent blade for this procedure is essential to making the necessary small incisions, according to the findings. – by Rob Volansky

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.