In the Journals

Free diced cartilage grafts may be effective in rhinoplasty for the nasal dorsum

A technique of dicing and placing free diced cartilage grafts was associated with low revision rates among patients undergoing rhinoplasty for irregularity or deformity of the nasal dorsum after hump reduction.

The retrospective analysis included data from 446 consecutive patients undergoing open approach rhinoplasties to augment or cover the nasal dorsum. The free diced cartilage grafts were harvested from the septum, rib or ear.

Multiple surgeons at a single center performed the procedures between January and December 2014.

There were three study groups: among 325 patients in the first group, free diced cartilage grafts were the only onlay; among 73 patients in the second group, the dorsal onlay was either fascia alone or in combination with the study intervention; among 48 patients in the third group, a dorsal augmentation with the classical diced cartilage in fascia technique was used.

During a 7-month follow-up period, 5.2% of patients in the first group underwent revision for dorsal irregularities, compared with 8.2% in the second group and 25% in the third. – by Rob Volansky

 

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

A technique of dicing and placing free diced cartilage grafts was associated with low revision rates among patients undergoing rhinoplasty for irregularity or deformity of the nasal dorsum after hump reduction.

The retrospective analysis included data from 446 consecutive patients undergoing open approach rhinoplasties to augment or cover the nasal dorsum. The free diced cartilage grafts were harvested from the septum, rib or ear.

Multiple surgeons at a single center performed the procedures between January and December 2014.

There were three study groups: among 325 patients in the first group, free diced cartilage grafts were the only onlay; among 73 patients in the second group, the dorsal onlay was either fascia alone or in combination with the study intervention; among 48 patients in the third group, a dorsal augmentation with the classical diced cartilage in fascia technique was used.

During a 7-month follow-up period, 5.2% of patients in the first group underwent revision for dorsal irregularities, compared with 8.2% in the second group and 25% in the third. – by Rob Volansky

 

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.