In the Journals

Closed incision negative-pressure therapy potentially reduces surgical-site infections

Researchers found that use of closed incision negative-pressure therapy over surgical incisions may be effective, and recommend considering this method in patients with multiple comorbidity and at high risk for wound infection, according to recent data in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

Closed incision negative-pressure therapy is more expensive than standard wound management; however, when compared with the potential ability to reduce surgical-site infections and the resulting costs, the use of the more expensive wound management systems may be justified, according to researchers.

For the meta-analysis, the researchers conducted a literature search for publications comparing closed incision negative-pressure therapy to standard incisional care.

Overall, the weighted average rates of surgical-site infections in the closed incision negative-pressure therapy and control groups were 6.61% and 9.36% respectively, reflecting a 29.4% relative reduction in surgical site infections.

Across all studies and incision-site location subgroups, a decrease in surgical-site infections was evident in the closed incision negative-pressure therapy group.

Rates of dehiscence were also improved in the closed incision negative-pressure therapy group: 5.32% vs. 10.68% in the controls. – by Abigail Sutton

Disclosure: Semsarzadeh reported no relevant financial disclosures. For a list of all remaining authors’ relevant financial disclosures, please see the full study.

Researchers found that use of closed incision negative-pressure therapy over surgical incisions may be effective, and recommend considering this method in patients with multiple comorbidity and at high risk for wound infection, according to recent data in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

Closed incision negative-pressure therapy is more expensive than standard wound management; however, when compared with the potential ability to reduce surgical-site infections and the resulting costs, the use of the more expensive wound management systems may be justified, according to researchers.

For the meta-analysis, the researchers conducted a literature search for publications comparing closed incision negative-pressure therapy to standard incisional care.

Overall, the weighted average rates of surgical-site infections in the closed incision negative-pressure therapy and control groups were 6.61% and 9.36% respectively, reflecting a 29.4% relative reduction in surgical site infections.

Across all studies and incision-site location subgroups, a decrease in surgical-site infections was evident in the closed incision negative-pressure therapy group.

Rates of dehiscence were also improved in the closed incision negative-pressure therapy group: 5.32% vs. 10.68% in the controls. – by Abigail Sutton

Disclosure: Semsarzadeh reported no relevant financial disclosures. For a list of all remaining authors’ relevant financial disclosures, please see the full study.