In the Journals

Optimize face transplant outcomes with soft-tissue, bony measurements

Researchers found early evidence in favor of soft-tissue and bony measurements in planning for facial transplantation.

Currently, donors and recipients are matched based on immune compatibility, skin characteristics, age and gender; thus aesthetic results of the match are not always optimal, according to researchers.

Considering the ethical issues associated with maintaining donor anonymity and the relatively low volume of cases available for study, realistic models of human facial transplantation were created rather than actual donors and recipients.

Using reconstructed high-resolution angiographs of male and female , researchers created 61 virtual face transplantation models.

Posttransplant disfigurement was rated by 20 independent reviewers.

The differences in nine soft-tissue measurements and 16 bony cephalometric measurements from each VFT donor and recipient pretransplant model were compared to the reviewers’ rating of disfigurement after VFT using a multivariate logistic regression model.

Researchers found five soft-tissue and bony tissue landmarks where inconsistencies between recipient and donor were correlated with a high degree of disfigurement: trichion-to-nasion facial height, endocanthal width, exocanthal width, mouth/chelion width, subnasale-to-menton facial height, inner orbit width, palatal plane/occlusal plane angle and sella-nasion/mandibular plane angle.

The soft-tissue measurements can be measured at bedside for both donor and recipient, according to researchers. Bony tissue landmarks may require radiological studies in the patients’ files.

Disclosure: The researchers repor no relevant financial disclosures.

Researchers found early evidence in favor of soft-tissue and bony measurements in planning for facial transplantation.

Currently, donors and recipients are matched based on immune compatibility, skin characteristics, age and gender; thus aesthetic results of the match are not always optimal, according to researchers.

Considering the ethical issues associated with maintaining donor anonymity and the relatively low volume of cases available for study, realistic models of human facial transplantation were created rather than actual donors and recipients.

Using reconstructed high-resolution angiographs of male and female , researchers created 61 virtual face transplantation models.

Posttransplant disfigurement was rated by 20 independent reviewers.

The differences in nine soft-tissue measurements and 16 bony cephalometric measurements from each VFT donor and recipient pretransplant model were compared to the reviewers’ rating of disfigurement after VFT using a multivariate logistic regression model.

Researchers found five soft-tissue and bony tissue landmarks where inconsistencies between recipient and donor were correlated with a high degree of disfigurement: trichion-to-nasion facial height, endocanthal width, exocanthal width, mouth/chelion width, subnasale-to-menton facial height, inner orbit width, palatal plane/occlusal plane angle and sella-nasion/mandibular plane angle.

The soft-tissue measurements can be measured at bedside for both donor and recipient, according to researchers. Bony tissue landmarks may require radiological studies in the patients’ files.

Disclosure: The researchers repor no relevant financial disclosures.