Meeting News Coverage

Men willing to discuss facial aging, but most have not undergone aesthetic procedures

CHICAGO — Surveyed men reported a willingness to discuss signs of aging and were aware of available facial aesthetic procedures, but had a low rate of undergoing the procedures, according to research presented at the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery annual meeting.

Terrence Keaney, MD, and colleagues conducted an online study of 600 injectable-naïve but aesthetically oriented men (mean age, 48 years) in the United States. Respondents had to have a household income of at least $50,000 a year and discretionary income.

Terrence Keaney, MD

Terrence Keaney

“They were asked if they currently had a cosmetic provider (dermatologist or plastic surgeon) and what signs of age they would feel comfortable talking to their physician about (based on 15 facial areas),” the researchers wrote.

The men were asked if they had heard of or tried specific facial aesthetic procedures or if they would consider and injectable procedures.

The men were mainly white (90%), married (73%) and had some college education (95%). Forty-three percent had a dermatologist and 4% had a plastic surgeon. Among those with a dermatologist or plastic surgeon, 64% had seen their provider in the past year. Facial wrinkles, hair loss and balding and periorbital region were areas men were willing to discuss with their physician. Red complexion, acne scarring or broken capillaries were subjects they were less likely to discuss.

The men had a higher awareness (>90%), for plastic surgery liposuction and hair transplant surgery and a lower awareness (39%) for dermal fillers. However, the trial rate for all procedures was 2% to 6%.

To “look good for my age” (70%) and to “look more youthful” (51%) were primary motivating factors for men considering an injectable treatment. Cost concerns (42%), an unnatural looking outcome (41%), side effects and safety (46%), injecting a foreign substance in their body (45%) and thinking they do not need it yet (47%) were “barriers to undergoing an injectable treatment.”

“Most men said they would consider an injectable because they want to look good for their age and look more youthful,” the researchers concluded. “These data provide a perspective on attitudes towards aesthetic treatments among men and may help clinicians to better understand their needs.” – by Bruce Thiel

Reference:

Keaney T. OA309. Understanding the Male Perspective on Office-based Aesthetic Procedures: Awareness, Motivating Factors and Barriers. Presented at: ASDS Annual Meeting; Oct. 15-18, 2015; Chicago.

Disclosure: Keaney reports no relevant financial disclosures. See the abstract for a full list of the other researchers’ relevant financial disclosures.

CHICAGO — Surveyed men reported a willingness to discuss signs of aging and were aware of available facial aesthetic procedures, but had a low rate of undergoing the procedures, according to research presented at the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery annual meeting.

Terrence Keaney, MD, and colleagues conducted an online study of 600 injectable-naïve but aesthetically oriented men (mean age, 48 years) in the United States. Respondents had to have a household income of at least $50,000 a year and discretionary income.

Terrence Keaney, MD

Terrence Keaney

“They were asked if they currently had a cosmetic provider (dermatologist or plastic surgeon) and what signs of age they would feel comfortable talking to their physician about (based on 15 facial areas),” the researchers wrote.

The men were asked if they had heard of or tried specific facial aesthetic procedures or if they would consider and injectable procedures.

The men were mainly white (90%), married (73%) and had some college education (95%). Forty-three percent had a dermatologist and 4% had a plastic surgeon. Among those with a dermatologist or plastic surgeon, 64% had seen their provider in the past year. Facial wrinkles, hair loss and balding and periorbital region were areas men were willing to discuss with their physician. Red complexion, acne scarring or broken capillaries were subjects they were less likely to discuss.

The men had a higher awareness (>90%), for plastic surgery liposuction and hair transplant surgery and a lower awareness (39%) for dermal fillers. However, the trial rate for all procedures was 2% to 6%.

To “look good for my age” (70%) and to “look more youthful” (51%) were primary motivating factors for men considering an injectable treatment. Cost concerns (42%), an unnatural looking outcome (41%), side effects and safety (46%), injecting a foreign substance in their body (45%) and thinking they do not need it yet (47%) were “barriers to undergoing an injectable treatment.”

“Most men said they would consider an injectable because they want to look good for their age and look more youthful,” the researchers concluded. “These data provide a perspective on attitudes towards aesthetic treatments among men and may help clinicians to better understand their needs.” – by Bruce Thiel

Reference:

Keaney T. OA309. Understanding the Male Perspective on Office-based Aesthetic Procedures: Awareness, Motivating Factors and Barriers. Presented at: ASDS Annual Meeting; Oct. 15-18, 2015; Chicago.

Disclosure: Keaney reports no relevant financial disclosures. See the abstract for a full list of the other researchers’ relevant financial disclosures.

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