In the Journals

Minimal nasolabial incision effective for nasolabial fold rehabilitation in paralysis

The minimal nasolabial incision technique demonstrated efficacy as a rehabilitation tool for the nasolabial fold in patients with facial paralysis.

The retrospective case series included 21 patients with facial paralysis who underwent nasolabial fold modification with the technique at a tertiary care center between Feb. 1, 2015, and Aug. 31, 2016.

The primary endpoints were the Facial Clinimetric Evaluation (FaCE) scale score as reported by patients; an electronic facial paralysis assessment (eFACE) by clinicians; layperson evaluation of the aesthetics of the nasolabial fold; and an expert-clinician evaluation of the nasolabial fold, according to the findings.

Both clinician- and patient-reported assessments demonstrated significant improvements in nasolabial fold after modification.

The preoperative eFACE score was 60.7, compared with 77.2 postoperatively (mean difference, 16.5; P < .001). Similarly, the static electronic FACE score improved from 61.4 before the operation and 82.7 after (mean difference, 21.3; P < .001).

Patients reported improved FaCE quality of life scores from 51.3 preoperatively to 70.3 postoperatively (mean difference, 19; P = .001).

For layperson assessment of aesthetic outcomes, patients treated with a minimal nasolabial incision had mean scores of 68.17, while those with historical incisions scored 56.28, a mean difference of 11.89 (P < .001).

A similar trend was observed for the expert-clinician scar assessment scores. Minimal nasolabial incision yielded a score of 3.78, while traditional incision was associated with a score of 2.98, for a mean difference of 0.8 (P = .007).

“The minimal nasolabial incision technique for [nasolabial fold] modification is effective in rehabilitating the [nasolabial fold] in facial paralysis without adding a long linear scar to the central midface,” the researchers concluded. – by Rob Volansky

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

The minimal nasolabial incision technique demonstrated efficacy as a rehabilitation tool for the nasolabial fold in patients with facial paralysis.

The retrospective case series included 21 patients with facial paralysis who underwent nasolabial fold modification with the technique at a tertiary care center between Feb. 1, 2015, and Aug. 31, 2016.

The primary endpoints were the Facial Clinimetric Evaluation (FaCE) scale score as reported by patients; an electronic facial paralysis assessment (eFACE) by clinicians; layperson evaluation of the aesthetics of the nasolabial fold; and an expert-clinician evaluation of the nasolabial fold, according to the findings.

Both clinician- and patient-reported assessments demonstrated significant improvements in nasolabial fold after modification.

The preoperative eFACE score was 60.7, compared with 77.2 postoperatively (mean difference, 16.5; P < .001). Similarly, the static electronic FACE score improved from 61.4 before the operation and 82.7 after (mean difference, 21.3; P < .001).

Patients reported improved FaCE quality of life scores from 51.3 preoperatively to 70.3 postoperatively (mean difference, 19; P = .001).

For layperson assessment of aesthetic outcomes, patients treated with a minimal nasolabial incision had mean scores of 68.17, while those with historical incisions scored 56.28, a mean difference of 11.89 (P < .001).

A similar trend was observed for the expert-clinician scar assessment scores. Minimal nasolabial incision yielded a score of 3.78, while traditional incision was associated with a score of 2.98, for a mean difference of 0.8 (P = .007).

“The minimal nasolabial incision technique for [nasolabial fold] modification is effective in rehabilitating the [nasolabial fold] in facial paralysis without adding a long linear scar to the central midface,” the researchers concluded. – by Rob Volansky

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.