In the Journals

Composite breast augmentation proves strong, reliable method

Composite breast augmentation is a reliable technique that yields strong results, according to recently published data.

The researchers noted that despite growing popularity, the technique has not been thoroughly investigated for complication and reoperation rates. The current retrospective chart review included 156 patients undergoing breast augmentation with combined use of implant and fat grafting between 2007 and 2013.

The average implant size was 252 cc, and patients received a mean of 126 cc (range, 30-250) of fat in subcutaneous soft tissue, according to the results.

An overall complication rate of 7.7% was reported, with 9.94% of patients undergoing reoperation. Baker grade II contracture occurred in 2.56% of patients, while Baker grade III occurred in 2%. Surgery was required to correct two of the patients in the grade III group.

Other complications included infections and hematoma, both which occurred in 1.28% of the cohort, followed by malrotation (0.64%).

Patients undergoing delayed reoperation (9.94%) underwent this procedure after a mean duration of 31.7 months.

Additional fat grafting for insufficient coverage was necessary in 1.92% of the group. For patients who required fat reinjection, the mean volume used was 170 cc.– by Rob Volansky

 

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Composite breast augmentation is a reliable technique that yields strong results, according to recently published data.

The researchers noted that despite growing popularity, the technique has not been thoroughly investigated for complication and reoperation rates. The current retrospective chart review included 156 patients undergoing breast augmentation with combined use of implant and fat grafting between 2007 and 2013.

The average implant size was 252 cc, and patients received a mean of 126 cc (range, 30-250) of fat in subcutaneous soft tissue, according to the results.

An overall complication rate of 7.7% was reported, with 9.94% of patients undergoing reoperation. Baker grade II contracture occurred in 2.56% of patients, while Baker grade III occurred in 2%. Surgery was required to correct two of the patients in the grade III group.

Other complications included infections and hematoma, both which occurred in 1.28% of the cohort, followed by malrotation (0.64%).

Patients undergoing delayed reoperation (9.94%) underwent this procedure after a mean duration of 31.7 months.

Additional fat grafting for insufficient coverage was necessary in 1.92% of the group. For patients who required fat reinjection, the mean volume used was 170 cc.– by Rob Volansky

 

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.