In the Journals

Low risk for nipple sensation changes, lactation issues in primary breast augmentation

Women who underwent primary breast augmentation had low risk for skin and nipple sensation changes and lactation issues, according to study results recently published in the Aesthetic Surgery Journal.

Researchers conducted an analysis based on 410 Continued Access study data to measure the safety and effectiveness of Natrelle 410 implants (Allergan plc) implanted by inframammary or periareolar incision locations. Patients underwent evaluations preoperatively and at 4 weeks, 6 months and annually for up to 10 years postoperatively.

The researchers assessed lactation issues and nipple and skin changes. There were 9,217 devices implanted through inframammary incision and 610 implants via periareolar incision.

Results were presorted for patients who underwent primary breast augmentation through surgical implantations of devices. In this cohort, there were 4,621 women (mean age, 36 years) who received implants via inframammary incision and 306 women (mean age, 36 years) who received implants through periareolar incision.

The first occurrence of nipple sensation changes was 0.3% (95% CI, 0.2-0.5) at week 4 and months 6 and 0.4% (95% CI, 0.3-0.7) at year 10 in the inframammary cohort. The risk of skin sensation changes in the inframammary cohort was 0% (95% CI, 0-0.2) at week 4, 0.1% (0-0.2) a month 6, and 0.1% (95% CI, 0-0.2) for all other measurement times.

“No nipple or skin changes occurred in the periareolar cohort,” the researchers wrote. ““The incidence of postimplantation lactation issues was similar to the incidence of lactation issues reported in the general population of postpartum women who do not have implants and have breastfed their babies.”

“The results indicate that the risk of complications from nipple or skin sensation changes and lactation issues is low,” the researchers concluded. – by Bruce Thiel

Disclosure: Lund reports being a consultant for Allergan plc. Please see the full study for a list of the other researchers’ relevant financial disclosures.

 

Women who underwent primary breast augmentation had low risk for skin and nipple sensation changes and lactation issues, according to study results recently published in the Aesthetic Surgery Journal.

Researchers conducted an analysis based on 410 Continued Access study data to measure the safety and effectiveness of Natrelle 410 implants (Allergan plc) implanted by inframammary or periareolar incision locations. Patients underwent evaluations preoperatively and at 4 weeks, 6 months and annually for up to 10 years postoperatively.

The researchers assessed lactation issues and nipple and skin changes. There were 9,217 devices implanted through inframammary incision and 610 implants via periareolar incision.

Results were presorted for patients who underwent primary breast augmentation through surgical implantations of devices. In this cohort, there were 4,621 women (mean age, 36 years) who received implants via inframammary incision and 306 women (mean age, 36 years) who received implants through periareolar incision.

The first occurrence of nipple sensation changes was 0.3% (95% CI, 0.2-0.5) at week 4 and months 6 and 0.4% (95% CI, 0.3-0.7) at year 10 in the inframammary cohort. The risk of skin sensation changes in the inframammary cohort was 0% (95% CI, 0-0.2) at week 4, 0.1% (0-0.2) a month 6, and 0.1% (95% CI, 0-0.2) for all other measurement times.

“No nipple or skin changes occurred in the periareolar cohort,” the researchers wrote. ““The incidence of postimplantation lactation issues was similar to the incidence of lactation issues reported in the general population of postpartum women who do not have implants and have breastfed their babies.”

“The results indicate that the risk of complications from nipple or skin sensation changes and lactation issues is low,” the researchers concluded. – by Bruce Thiel

Disclosure: Lund reports being a consultant for Allergan plc. Please see the full study for a list of the other researchers’ relevant financial disclosures.