In the Journals

Novel cranioplasty technique incorporates biologic, nonbiologic materials

A novel approach to defect coverage in cranioplasty using both biologic autologous bone and nonbiologic allograft materials showed satisfactory aesthetic and safety outcomes in a recent study.

The retrospective medical record review included 26 patients undergoing primary cranioplasty at a single center between January 2011 and December 2015.

Factors evaluated included infection incidence, hematoma, flap loss or resorption, cerebrospinal fluid leak, hardware exposure or malfunction, and necessity of repeated procedures, according to the findings.

The cohort was predominantly male, with a mean age of 65.8 years; 31% of patients had diabetes, 15% were receiving immunosuppressive drugs, and 19% were current smokers.

Neoplasia accounted for 71% of the operative defects that required intervention.

All patients but one experienced successful mineralization after primary cranioplasty with the novel procedure. Both physical exams and imaging analyses were used to confirm these results.

Three patients developed postoperative infections, according to the results. The integrity of the cranioplasty was lost in one of these instances, for an overall loss rate of 4% and an overall infection rate of 11%.

Clinicians observed no impact of preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy on graft survival.

“The results using a unique technique for incorporating both biologic autologous bone and nonbiologic allograft materials for defect coverage in cranioplasty are favorable, with satisfactory aesthetic outcomes and limited postoperative complications,” the researchers concluded. – by Rob Volansky

Disclosure: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

A novel approach to defect coverage in cranioplasty using both biologic autologous bone and nonbiologic allograft materials showed satisfactory aesthetic and safety outcomes in a recent study.

The retrospective medical record review included 26 patients undergoing primary cranioplasty at a single center between January 2011 and December 2015.

Factors evaluated included infection incidence, hematoma, flap loss or resorption, cerebrospinal fluid leak, hardware exposure or malfunction, and necessity of repeated procedures, according to the findings.

The cohort was predominantly male, with a mean age of 65.8 years; 31% of patients had diabetes, 15% were receiving immunosuppressive drugs, and 19% were current smokers.

Neoplasia accounted for 71% of the operative defects that required intervention.

All patients but one experienced successful mineralization after primary cranioplasty with the novel procedure. Both physical exams and imaging analyses were used to confirm these results.

Three patients developed postoperative infections, according to the results. The integrity of the cranioplasty was lost in one of these instances, for an overall loss rate of 4% and an overall infection rate of 11%.

Clinicians observed no impact of preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy on graft survival.

“The results using a unique technique for incorporating both biologic autologous bone and nonbiologic allograft materials for defect coverage in cranioplasty are favorable, with satisfactory aesthetic outcomes and limited postoperative complications,” the researchers concluded. – by Rob Volansky

Disclosure: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.