In the Journals

Increased dairy product consumption linked with greater risk for total hip arthroplasty in men with OA

Increased dairy production consumption was linked with a greater risk for total hip arthroplasty in men with osteoarthritis, according to a recently published analysis.

“There is evidence for an increased risk of hip [osteoarthritis] OA associated with higher [bone mineral density] BMD, Yuanyuan Wang, PhD, from Monash University in Australia, and colleagues wrote. “Higher milk consumption may alter hip bone geometry by reducing bone turnover and bone resorption.”

Investigators performed a prospective study of 38,924 participants between 1990 and 1994 and identified total hip arthroplasties (THAs) performed for OA between 2001 and 2013. Wang and colleagues identified 524 men and 981 women who underwent THA during an average follow-up of 11.8 years.

In men, a one standard deviation increase in dairy product consumption was linked with an increased risk for THA (ratio = 1.21), with a dose-response relationship for dairy consumption, after adjustment for age, BMI, birth country, education, hypertension, diabetes, smoking status, physical activity, calcium supplementation and circulation of 25-hydroxy vitamin D. However, there was no association found for women.

“Women lose 50% of their trabecular bone and 30% of their cortical bone during the course of their lifetime, half of which is lost during the perimenopause and the first 10 years after menopause,” the researchers wrote. “Sex steroids are associated with hip bone geometric changes [and] sex differences have also been noted in the prevalence severity and incidence of hip OA.” – by Will A. Offit

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Increased dairy production consumption was linked with a greater risk for total hip arthroplasty in men with osteoarthritis, according to a recently published analysis.

“There is evidence for an increased risk of hip [osteoarthritis] OA associated with higher [bone mineral density] BMD, Yuanyuan Wang, PhD, from Monash University in Australia, and colleagues wrote. “Higher milk consumption may alter hip bone geometry by reducing bone turnover and bone resorption.”

Investigators performed a prospective study of 38,924 participants between 1990 and 1994 and identified total hip arthroplasties (THAs) performed for OA between 2001 and 2013. Wang and colleagues identified 524 men and 981 women who underwent THA during an average follow-up of 11.8 years.

In men, a one standard deviation increase in dairy product consumption was linked with an increased risk for THA (ratio = 1.21), with a dose-response relationship for dairy consumption, after adjustment for age, BMI, birth country, education, hypertension, diabetes, smoking status, physical activity, calcium supplementation and circulation of 25-hydroxy vitamin D. However, there was no association found for women.

“Women lose 50% of their trabecular bone and 30% of their cortical bone during the course of their lifetime, half of which is lost during the perimenopause and the first 10 years after menopause,” the researchers wrote. “Sex steroids are associated with hip bone geometric changes [and] sex differences have also been noted in the prevalence severity and incidence of hip OA.” – by Will A. Offit

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.