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Psychotherapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Jürgen Hoyer, PhD; Colin van der Heiden, PhD; Michael E. Portman, DPhil, LISW-S

Abstract

Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is increasingly recognized as a prevalent anxiety disorder with a chronic course and significant impairment.1 Chronic and uncontrollable worry, a future-oriented and highly negative form of verbal thought, is considered its key feature. However, GAD is also associated with rigidity and dysfunctions in cognition, affect, and behavior, as well as physiology.2 Negative and self-perpetuating spiralling interactions between these domains are thought to comprise GAD.
Authors

Jürgen Hoyer, PhD, is with the Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Technische Universität Dresden (Germany). Colin van der Heiden, PhD, is with the Outpatient Treatment Centre PsyQ, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Michael E. Portman, DPhil, LISW-S, is with the Cleveland Veterans Administration, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH.

Dr. Hoyer and Dr. van der Heiden have disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Dr. Portman has disclosed the following relevant financial relationships: Springer Science: Royalty recipient.

Address correspondence to: Jürgen Hoyer, PhD, Technische Universität Dresden, Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie, Hohe Str. 53, D-01187 Dresden, Germany; fax 49-351-46336955; or e-mail: .hoyer@psychologie.tu-dresden.de

10.3928/00485713-20110203-07

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