In the Journals

Severe hot flashes increase risk for depression

Moderate-severe menopausal vasomotor symptoms were independently and significantly associated with moderate-severe depressive symptoms in women aged 40 to 65 years.

“The results of this study shed further light on therapeutic findings, with both antidepressant medication and estrogen therapy having the potential to improve hot flashes and mood,” Susan G. Kornstein, MD, editor-in-chief of Journal of Women’s Health, said in a press release.

To determine associations between moderate-severe menopausal vasomotor symptoms and moderate-severe depression symptoms, researchers conducted a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of 2,020 Australian women aged 40 to 65 years.

Overall, 13.3% of the cohort had moderate-severe menopausal vasomotor symptoms.

When adjusting for age, partnership status, paid employment, housing insecurity and BMI, women with moderate-severe menopausal vasomotor symptoms were more likely to have moderate-severe depressive symptoms (OR = 2.8; 95% CI, 2.01-3.88; P < .001), compared with women with no or mild menopausal vasomotor symptoms.

Experiencing moderate-severe depressive symptoms was associated with greater likelihood of using psychotropic medications (P < .001), smoking (P < .001), and binge drinking at least weekly (P < .015).

“Moderate-severe [menopausal vasomotor symptoms] are independently and significantly associated with moderate-severe depressive symptoms. Among Australian women aged 40 to 65, both these symptoms are common, as is the use of antidepressant medication,” the researchers concluded. – by Amanda Oldt

Disclosure: Worsley reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for a full list of relevant financial disclosures.

Moderate-severe menopausal vasomotor symptoms were independently and significantly associated with moderate-severe depressive symptoms in women aged 40 to 65 years.

“The results of this study shed further light on therapeutic findings, with both antidepressant medication and estrogen therapy having the potential to improve hot flashes and mood,” Susan G. Kornstein, MD, editor-in-chief of Journal of Women’s Health, said in a press release.

To determine associations between moderate-severe menopausal vasomotor symptoms and moderate-severe depression symptoms, researchers conducted a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of 2,020 Australian women aged 40 to 65 years.

Overall, 13.3% of the cohort had moderate-severe menopausal vasomotor symptoms.

When adjusting for age, partnership status, paid employment, housing insecurity and BMI, women with moderate-severe menopausal vasomotor symptoms were more likely to have moderate-severe depressive symptoms (OR = 2.8; 95% CI, 2.01-3.88; P < .001), compared with women with no or mild menopausal vasomotor symptoms.

Experiencing moderate-severe depressive symptoms was associated with greater likelihood of using psychotropic medications (P < .001), smoking (P < .001), and binge drinking at least weekly (P < .015).

“Moderate-severe [menopausal vasomotor symptoms] are independently and significantly associated with moderate-severe depressive symptoms. Among Australian women aged 40 to 65, both these symptoms are common, as is the use of antidepressant medication,” the researchers concluded. – by Amanda Oldt

Disclosure: Worsley reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for a full list of relevant financial disclosures.