Feature Article 

A Mindfulness Intervention for Residents: Relevance for Pediatricians

Mallory Taylor, MD; Joseph R. Hageman, MD; Melanie Brown, MD

Abstract

Physician burnout is a topic of growing importance in today's health care system. Tangible interventions aimed at reducing burnout and promoting wellness are now necessary components of medical training and practice. A study examined the feasibility and impact of a brief mindfulness intervention using a free smartphone application with a resident population. Participants used a free smartphone application to complete a 10-day program in mindfulness meditation, and completed surveys at the end of the program. Lack of time and knowledge were the top two barriers to regular meditation practice. More research in this area using a larger population is needed to further characterize the effects of mindfulness on medical trainees, as well as its utility for practicing pediatricians. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(10):e373–e376.]

Authors

Mallory Taylor, MD, is a Pediatrician, Central Peninsula Family Practice. Joseph R. Hageman, MD, is the Director of Quality Improvement, Section of Neonatology, Comer Children's Hospital; a Senior Clinician Educator, The University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine; and an Emeritus Attending Pediatrician, NorthShore University HealthSystem. Melanie Brown, MD, is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics; the Medical Director, Pediatric Comfort Team; and the Associate Program Director, Pediatric Residency Program, University of Chicago Comer Children's Hospital.

Address correspondence to Mallory Taylor, MD, Central Peninsula Family Practice, 506 Lake Street, Kenai, AK, 99611; email: taymolly@gmail.com.

Grant: M. T. and M. B. received a grant from the Oberweiler Foundation to support presentation of the poster at the Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting; April 25–28, 2015; San Diego, CA.

Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial relationships to disclose.

10.3928/19382359-20160912-01

Physician burnout is a topic of growing importance in today's health care system. Tangible interventions aimed at reducing burnout and promoting wellness are now necessary components of medical training and practice. A study examined the feasibility and impact of a brief mindfulness intervention using a free smartphone application with a resident population. Participants used a free smartphone application to complete a 10-day program in mindfulness meditation, and completed surveys at the end of the program. Lack of time and knowledge were the top two barriers to regular meditation practice. More research in this area using a larger population is needed to further characterize the effects of mindfulness on medical trainees, as well as its utility for practicing pediatricians. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(10):e373–e376.]

Mallory Taylor, MD, is a Pediatrician, Central Peninsula Family Practice. Joseph R. Hageman, MD, is the Director of Quality Improvement, Section of Neonatology, Comer Children's Hospital; a Senior Clinician Educator, The University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine; and an Emeritus Attending Pediatrician, NorthShore University HealthSystem. Melanie Brown, MD, is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics; the Medical Director, Pediatric Comfort Team; and the Associate Program Director, Pediatric Residency Program, University of Chicago Comer Children's Hospital.

Address correspondence to Mallory Taylor, MD, Central Peninsula Family Practice, 506 Lake Street, Kenai, AK, 99611; email: taymolly@gmail.com.

Grant: M. T. and M. B. received a grant from the Oberweiler Foundation to support presentation of the poster at the Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting; April 25–28, 2015; San Diego, CA.

Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial relationships to disclose.

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