Case Report 

Retinal Detachment After Subretinal Stem Cell Transplantation

Ella H. Leung, MD; Harry W. Flynn, MD; Thomas A. Albini, MD; Carlos A. Medina, MD

Abstract

A 60-year-old man with Stargardt's macular dystrophy and visual acuity of 20/400 in the right eye and 20/60 in the left eye underwent a subretinal injection of autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells in the right eye. The patient developed a retinal detachment in the right eye 2 months later that was initially treated with a scleral buckle, but the patient subsequently developed a recurrent retinal detachment with proliferative vitreoretinopathy. A pars plana vitrectomy, membrane peel, fluid-air exchange, endolaser, and silicone oil injection were then performed. The retina remained attached 5 months later, with improvement in visual acuity from hand motions to 20/300 post-vitrectomy. Retinal detachment may occur after subretinal injection of stem cells. Proliferative vitreoretinopathy may develop in these patients, but the visual acuity may return to baseline after retinal reattachment.

[Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:600–601.]

Authors

From the Department of Ophthalmology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miami.

Supported in part by an unrestricted grant from Research to Prevent Blindness and the National Eye Institute Center Core Grant (P30EY014801) to the Department of Ophthalmology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Address correspondence to Harry W. Flynn Jr., MD, 900 NW 17th St, Miami, FL 33136; 305-326-6118; fax: 305-326-6417; email: hflynn@med.miami.edu.

Received: February 19, 2016
Accepted: March 25, 2016

10.3928/23258160-20160601-16

A 60-year-old man with Stargardt's macular dystrophy and visual acuity of 20/400 in the right eye and 20/60 in the left eye underwent a subretinal injection of autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells in the right eye. The patient developed a retinal detachment in the right eye 2 months later that was initially treated with a scleral buckle, but the patient subsequently developed a recurrent retinal detachment with proliferative vitreoretinopathy. A pars plana vitrectomy, membrane peel, fluid-air exchange, endolaser, and silicone oil injection were then performed. The retina remained attached 5 months later, with improvement in visual acuity from hand motions to 20/300 post-vitrectomy. Retinal detachment may occur after subretinal injection of stem cells. Proliferative vitreoretinopathy may develop in these patients, but the visual acuity may return to baseline after retinal reattachment.

[Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:600–601.]

From the Department of Ophthalmology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miami.

Supported in part by an unrestricted grant from Research to Prevent Blindness and the National Eye Institute Center Core Grant (P30EY014801) to the Department of Ophthalmology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Address correspondence to Harry W. Flynn Jr., MD, 900 NW 17th St, Miami, FL 33136; 305-326-6118; fax: 305-326-6417; email: hflynn@med.miami.edu.

Received: February 19, 2016
Accepted: March 25, 2016
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