New Technology 

Optical Measurement of Straylight in Eyes With Cataract

Onurcan Sahin, MSc; Alexandros Pennos, MSc; Harilaos Ginis, PhD; Lucia Hervella, MSc; Eloy A. Villegas, PhD; Belen Cañizares, MD; Jose Maria Marin, MD, PhD; Ioannis Pallikaris, MD, PhD; Pablo Artal, PhD

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To measure straylight in a cohort of patients with cataract using a novel optical instrument and to correlate optical straylight values with clinical grade of cataracts and psychophysical straylight values.

METHODS:

Measurements were performed on 53 eyes of 44 patients with cataract admitted to the ophthalmology service of the university hospital in Murcia, Spain, and 9 young volunteers with no known ophthalmic pathology. Lens opacities were classified according to the Lens Opacities Classification System Ill (LOCS III) under slit-lamp examination. Intraocular straylight was additionally assessed psychophysically using the C-Quant straylight meter (Oculus Optikgeräte GmbH, Wetzlar, Germany).

RESULTS:

Optical measurements of the logarithm of the straylight parameter ranged from 1.01 to 2.01 (mean: 1.43 ± 0.244) in patients with cataract and 0.80 to 1.08 (mean: 0.92 ± 0.104) in healthy young volunteers. Straylight differed by a statistically significant amount among different LOCS III groups (P < .05). Moreover, the optically measured straylight parameter was positively correlated to the psychophysically estimated value (r = 0.803, P < .05).

CONCLUSIONS:

A new compact optical instrument suitable for clinical measurements of straylight in the human eye has been developed. Optically measured straylight values were highly correlated to those that were obtained psychophysically. Optical measurement of straylight can be used for the objective classification of cataract opacities based on their optical impact.

[J Refract Surg. 2016;32(12):846–850.]

Authors

From the University of Crete, Institute of Vision and Optics, Heraklion, Greece (OS, IP); Universidad de Murcia, Laboratorio de Optica, Murcia, Spain (AP, HG, LH, EAV, PA); and Servicio de Oftalmología, Hospital Virgen de la Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain (BC, JMM).

Supported by the European Research Council Advanced Grant ERC-2013-AdG-339228 (SEECAT) and the Spanish SEIDI, grant FIS2013-41237-R and European Regional Development Fund (EU-FEDER) & OpAL (PITN-GA-2010-264605).

Drs. Ginis and Artal have a patent on the optical instrument for the measurement of straylight used in this study. The remaining authors have no financial or proprietary interest in the materials presented herein.

AUTHOR CONTRIBUTIONS

Study concept and design (OS, AP, HG, IP, PA); data collection (LH, EAV, BC); analysis and interpretation of data (OS, AP, LH, IP, JMM, PA); writing the manuscript (OS, AP, HG, BC, PA); critical revision of the manuscript (OS, AP, HG, LH, EAV, JMM, PA); statistical expertise (OS); administrative, technical, or material support (OS, IP); supervision (JMM, IP, PA)

Correspondence: Harilaos Ginis, PhD, Laboratorio de Optica, Universidad de Murcia, Campus Espinardo, CIOyN, Edificio 34, 30100, Espinardo, Murcia, Spain. E-mail: ginis@um.es

Received: April 22, 2016
Accepted: August 29, 2016

10.3928/1081597X-20160920-02

PURPOSE:

To measure straylight in a cohort of patients with cataract using a novel optical instrument and to correlate optical straylight values with clinical grade of cataracts and psychophysical straylight values.

METHODS:

Measurements were performed on 53 eyes of 44 patients with cataract admitted to the ophthalmology service of the university hospital in Murcia, Spain, and 9 young volunteers with no known ophthalmic pathology. Lens opacities were classified according to the Lens Opacities Classification System Ill (LOCS III) under slit-lamp examination. Intraocular straylight was additionally assessed psychophysically using the C-Quant straylight meter (Oculus Optikgeräte GmbH, Wetzlar, Germany).

RESULTS:

Optical measurements of the logarithm of the straylight parameter ranged from 1.01 to 2.01 (mean: 1.43 ± 0.244) in patients with cataract and 0.80 to 1.08 (mean: 0.92 ± 0.104) in healthy young volunteers. Straylight differed by a statistically significant amount among different LOCS III groups (P < .05). Moreover, the optically measured straylight parameter was positively correlated to the psychophysically estimated value (r = 0.803, P < .05).

CONCLUSIONS:

A new compact optical instrument suitable for clinical measurements of straylight in the human eye has been developed. Optically measured straylight values were highly correlated to those that were obtained psychophysically. Optical measurement of straylight can be used for the objective classification of cataract opacities based on their optical impact.

[J Refract Surg. 2016;32(12):846–850.]

From the University of Crete, Institute of Vision and Optics, Heraklion, Greece (OS, IP); Universidad de Murcia, Laboratorio de Optica, Murcia, Spain (AP, HG, LH, EAV, PA); and Servicio de Oftalmología, Hospital Virgen de la Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain (BC, JMM).

Supported by the European Research Council Advanced Grant ERC-2013-AdG-339228 (SEECAT) and the Spanish SEIDI, grant FIS2013-41237-R and European Regional Development Fund (EU-FEDER) & OpAL (PITN-GA-2010-264605).

Drs. Ginis and Artal have a patent on the optical instrument for the measurement of straylight used in this study. The remaining authors have no financial or proprietary interest in the materials presented herein.

AUTHOR CONTRIBUTIONS

Study concept and design (OS, AP, HG, IP, PA); data collection (LH, EAV, BC); analysis and interpretation of data (OS, AP, LH, IP, JMM, PA); writing the manuscript (OS, AP, HG, BC, PA); critical revision of the manuscript (OS, AP, HG, LH, EAV, JMM, PA); statistical expertise (OS); administrative, technical, or material support (OS, IP); supervision (JMM, IP, PA)

Correspondence: Harilaos Ginis, PhD, Laboratorio de Optica, Universidad de Murcia, Campus Espinardo, CIOyN, Edificio 34, 30100, Espinardo, Murcia, Spain. E-mail: ginis@um.es

Received: April 22, 2016
Accepted: August 29, 2016
  • ISRS Members:
Read This Article
  • Subscriber
  • Non-Subscriber
Read This Article
This Article
Advertisement
Advertisement