Major Article 

Hiring and Incorporating Doctor of Nursing Practice–Prepared Nurse Faculty Into Academic Nursing Programs

Charlotte A. Agger, MA; Marilyn H. Oermann, PhD, RN, ANEF, FAAN; Mary R. Lynn, PhD, RN

Abstract

Semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 deans and directors of nursing programs across the United States to gain an understanding of how Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)–prepared nurses seeking academic positions are hired and used in schools of nursing. Interviews sought to gain information regarding (a) differences and similarities in the roles and responsibilities of DNP- and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)–prepared faculty, (b) educational advancement and mentoring of DNP-prepared nurse faculty, (c) recruitment of doctorally prepared nurse faculty, and (d) shortages of nursing faculty. DNP- and PhD-prepared nurse faculty are hired for varying roles in baccalaureate and higher degree schools of nursing, some similar to other faculty with master’s degrees and others similar to those with PhDs; in associate degree in nursing programs, they are largely hired for the same type of work as nurse faculty with master’s degrees. Regardless of program or degree type, the main role of DNP-prepared faculty is teaching. [J Nurs Educ. 2014;53(8):439–446.]

Ms. Agger is a doctoral student, and Dr. Lynn is Professor and Assistant Director, Quality and Training, Office of Human Research Ethics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill; Dr. Oermann is Thelma M. Ingles Professor and Director of Evaluation and Educational Research, Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina.

Support for this research was provided by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Evaluating Innovations in Nursing Education (70185).

The authors have disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise.

Address correspondence to Charlotte Agger, MA, CB 3500, 202 Pea-body Hall: Graduate Student Lounge, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599; e-mail: agger@live.unc.edu.

Received: November 07, 2013
Accepted: February 19, 2014
Posted Online: July 24, 2014

10.3928/01484834-20140724-03

Semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 deans and directors of nursing programs across the United States to gain an understanding of how Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)–prepared nurses seeking academic positions are hired and used in schools of nursing. Interviews sought to gain information regarding (a) differences and similarities in the roles and responsibilities of DNP- and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)–prepared faculty, (b) educational advancement and mentoring of DNP-prepared nurse faculty, (c) recruitment of doctorally prepared nurse faculty, and (d) shortages of nursing faculty. DNP- and PhD-prepared nurse faculty are hired for varying roles in baccalaureate and higher degree schools of nursing, some similar to other faculty with master’s degrees and others similar to those with PhDs; in associate degree in nursing programs, they are largely hired for the same type of work as nurse faculty with master’s degrees. Regardless of program or degree type, the main role of DNP-prepared faculty is teaching. [J Nurs Educ. 2014;53(8):439–446.]

Ms. Agger is a doctoral student, and Dr. Lynn is Professor and Assistant Director, Quality and Training, Office of Human Research Ethics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill; Dr. Oermann is Thelma M. Ingles Professor and Director of Evaluation and Educational Research, Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina.

Support for this research was provided by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Evaluating Innovations in Nursing Education (70185).

The authors have disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise.

Address correspondence to Charlotte Agger, MA, CB 3500, 202 Pea-body Hall: Graduate Student Lounge, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599; e-mail: agger@live.unc.edu.

Received: November 07, 2013
Accepted: February 19, 2014
Posted Online: July 24, 2014
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