NCI grant to fund AML research at City of Hope

The NCI awarded a $2.3 million grant to a research team at City of Hope led by Steven T. Rosen, MD, the institution’s provost and chief scientific officer.

The grant will fund studies associated with a phase 1/phase 2 clinical trial of 8-chloro-adenosine in relapsed/refractory adult acute myeloid leukemia.

Steven T. Rosen, MD

Steven T. Rosen

The clinical trial will assess the agent’s safety and efficacy in patients with AML who did not respond to initial chemotherapy.

The NCI grant will fund correlative investigations that will allow researchers to conduct genomic profiling of AML cells in hopes of identifying patients who might derive particular benefit from 8-chloro-adenosine. The grant also will help researchers further study the agent’s mechanism of action.

“AML patients need targeted therapies that are more effective and less toxic than current chemotherapies,” Rosen said in a press release. “We’re hopeful that successful completion of the study will not only extend or save the lives of those enrolled in the initial trial but also set the stage for continued clinical trials.”

The NCI awarded a $2.3 million grant to a research team at City of Hope led by Steven T. Rosen, MD, the institution’s provost and chief scientific officer.

The grant will fund studies associated with a phase 1/phase 2 clinical trial of 8-chloro-adenosine in relapsed/refractory adult acute myeloid leukemia.

Steven T. Rosen, MD

Steven T. Rosen

The clinical trial will assess the agent’s safety and efficacy in patients with AML who did not respond to initial chemotherapy.

The NCI grant will fund correlative investigations that will allow researchers to conduct genomic profiling of AML cells in hopes of identifying patients who might derive particular benefit from 8-chloro-adenosine. The grant also will help researchers further study the agent’s mechanism of action.

“AML patients need targeted therapies that are more effective and less toxic than current chemotherapies,” Rosen said in a press release. “We’re hopeful that successful completion of the study will not only extend or save the lives of those enrolled in the initial trial but also set the stage for continued clinical trials.”